The 3rd US-China Computer Science Leadership Summit, Peking University, China

KIAA, PKU, June 14-15 2010


Monday, June 14, 2010

Background | Committee | Program Photos

Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics at Peking University (KIAA-PKU)

Hosted by PKU-UCLA JRI, jointly sponsored by National Science Foundation and National Natural Science Foundation of China

Background

Under NSF sponsorship, a delegation of leaders of major U.S. computer science (CS) academic institutions (mostly deans and department chairs) visited China from May 20 to June 3, 2006. The goals of the trip were to establish a dialogue between leaders of major U.S. and Chinese computer science departments, to enable the U.S. leaders to gain insight into current and future trends in information technology research in China, and lay the groundwork for potential future interactions. The delegation helped to organize and participated in the first U.S.-China Computer Science Leadership Summit, which was held on May 23, 2006 at Beihang University in Beijing. The Summit involved U.S. and Chinese colleagues in discussions of issues of common interest. The issues discussed included state of the art in education and research, Ph.D. training, CS faculty selection and retaining, evaluation of CS research and its impact, and the role of funding agencies and research centers. Before and after the Summit, the delegation visited Chinese universities and research laboratories. This visit successfully achieved our goal of "insightful understanding" of China's higher education and research in computer science and information technology, which is important to the leaders in U.S. universities and research institutions.

At the first Summit, U.S. and Chinese participants reached a consensus to repeat the event in the U.S. In its report to NSF, the U.S. delegation recommended that NSF should hold a follow-up Leadership Summit in the U.S. and then a subsequent follow-up activity in China, encourage the creation of a joint U.S./China steering committee to develop ideas for future collaborations, and encourage China to put together a delegation similar to ours that would visit U.S. universities. The second Summit was an outcome of that recommendation. We organized campus visits for the Chinese delegation to leading U.S. Computer Science Departments, including both public and private, large and small universities. The culmination of the program was a visit to and dialogue with leaders of NSF on July 10, 2008 and the Second U.S.-China CS Leadership Summit on July 11.

As a result of the success of previous Summits, with the goals of building on ideas generated at the second Summit and in discussions afterwards, a third Summit is therefore planned for China to hold in June 2010 with the following three main themes: Large Collaborative Research Projects, Computer Science in Service to Society and Multidisciplinary Computer Science Education.

The Agenda of the Summit: English

Organizing Committee and Summit Participants

General Chairs:
  • Jiaguang Sun (National Natural Science Foundation of China and Tsinghua University)
  • Jeannette Wing (National Science Foundation and Carnegie Mellon University)
Committee Members from U.S.
  • Jason Cong (University of California at Los Angeles)
  • Fred Roberts (Rutgers University)
  • Rebecca Wright (Rutgers University)
  • Xiaodong Zhang (Ohio State University)

Committee Members from China

  • Wenguang Chen (Tsinghua University)
  • Xiaoming Li (Peking University)
  • Hong Mei (Peking University)
  • Zhiwei Xu (ICT)

Participants from U.S.

  • Jason Cong, University of California at Los Angeles
  • Alexander Deanglis, National Science Foundation
  • Deborah Estrin, University of California at Los Angeles
  • Rajesh Gupta, University of California at San Diego
  • Vipin Kumar, University of Minnesota
  • Monica Lam, Stanford University
  • James Landay, University of Washington
  • Keith Marzullo, University of California at San Diego
  • Steven Phillips, AT&T Labes Research
  • Bruce Porter, the University of Texas at Autin
  • David Shmoys, Cornell University
  • Fred Roberts, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey
  • Ida Sim, University of California at San Francisco
  • Xian-He Sun, Illinois Institute of Technology
  • Peter Szolovits, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Jeannette Wing, National Science Foundation
  • Rebecca Wright, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey
  • Xiaodong Zhang, the Ohio State University

Participants from China

  • Tony CHAN, the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
  • Eric CHANG, Microsoft Research Asia
  • Wenguang CHEN, Tsinghua University
  • Minyi GUO, Shanghai Jiaotong University
  • Jifeng HE, East China Normal University
  • Yuan HE, the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
  • Jinpeng HUAI, Beihang University
  • Hai JIN, Huazhong University of Science and Technology
  • Guojie LI, Chinese Academy of Sciences
  • Ling LI, Peking University
  • Mingshu LI, Chinese Academy of Sciences
  • Mo LI, the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
  • Xiaoming LI, Peking University
  • Xuandong LI, Nanjing University
  • Ke LIU, National Natural Science Foundation of China
  • Yunhao LIU, the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
  • Jian LV, Nanjing University
  • Dianfu MA, Beihang University
  • Hong MEI, Peking University
  • Lionel M. NI, the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
  • Depei QIAN, Beihang University
  • Yuwen QIN, National Natural Science Foundation of China
  • Weisong SHI, Tongji University
  • Jiaguang SUN, National Natural Science Foundation of China, Tsinghua University
  • Maosong SUN, Tsinghua University
  • Ninghui SUN, Chinese Academy of Sciences
  • Huaimin WANG, National University of Defense Technology
  • Jianping WU, Tsinghua University
  • Xiaofei XU, Harbin Institute of Technology
  • Zhiwei XU, Chinese Academy of Sciences
  • Zhaotian ZHANG, National Natural Science Foundation of China
  • Yueting ZHUANG, Zhejiang University

Photos

More photos, please click here.